Posts Tagged renewable energy

Renewable energy – The missing link

This is a great video from those clever people at Ted.com, the speaker is David Sadoway who has been looking into what type of battery can be used to store renewable energy so that we can still make use of it even when the suns not out and the winds not blowing.

The video is a great insight into the potential future of renewable energy and is a great argument boost towards the realisation of renewable energy as a sustainable source of power for the future.

Possibly the most inspiring part of the talk is David’s willingness to think about these problems from a different perspective his philosophy is “We need to think about the problem differently. We need to think big. We need to think cheap.”

 

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Denmark offer renewable energy insight for other nations

Denmark has long been one of Europe’s leading renewable energy adopters and they have managed to maintain a steady pace with regards to increasing the amount of energy they produce from renewable sources.
Now the Danes are offering their renewable energy model for other nations to copy and help generate their own renewable energy supply. At the moment around 28% of Danish energy comes from renewables but they are aiming high and want to see 50% by 2020 and as much as 100% by 2050.

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Is the UK puffed out with renewable energy?

The guardian has started a three part piece on the future of renewable energy, or more accurately wind farms in the UK. This appears to have stemmed from the growing concerns regarding the cost and sight of the turbines up and down the country.

A recent report from the ENSG (Electricity Networks Strategy Group), who are seen as being the most current view from inside government, Ofgem and other key industry investors have estimated that 28.3GW of wind power (offshore and onshore combined) could have been built by 2020. This has now fallen by 4GW in only two years, and another 1GW is already scheduled to be removed from the current forecast.

This paints a worrying picture for what was a booming industry one of the largest issues aside from complaints about the aesthetics is that the cost to link the new energy sources up to the current energy distribution network has almost doubled in price up from £4.7bn to £8.8bn.

The cost is mainly to create two new underwater pipelines connecting renewable energy from the Scottish Islands to England and North Wales.

Personally I think it will be interesting to see how the previously well catered for pro-renewable groups react to these latest cuts. Part of the problem for most Britons is that they need their gas and electricity to be cheap but at the moment the renewable subsidies only seem to be adding to the bills. Whilst it is for the right reasons a lot of people in Britain can’t afford to support it just now and when nuclear is knocking on the door as a cheap and reliable alternative it only makes things harder.

Feel free to leave a comment if you have any thoughts or insight?

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Isle of Wight to be the future of renewable energy…

The UK’s largest ever renewable energy project got underway last week with the creation of the Ecoisland consortium. The consortium is made up of leading green energy company ITM Power and a number of international powerhouses including: Toshiba, SSE, Southern Water, Cable & Wireless Worldwide and IBM.

The group intend to use ‘smart technology’ to create a renewable energy system on the Isle of Wight, the idea is to show how energy systems will be in the future.

ITM Power are supplying hydrogen production and refuelling equipment that will be connected to renewable energy systems: wind, solar, tidal and geothermal. The technology will be used to refuel hydrogen adapted vehicles.

David Green the Ecoisland founder has said “The collection of technologies that we are bringing together on Ecoisland will provide the total energy solution for tomorrow’s world.”

I think it is another great project for the UK and shows that we are still at the forefront of the renewable energy race.

Do you have any thoughts? Could this kind of money and resources be better spent in the current climate?

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Frozen planet: a real look at climate change

By the looks of Twitter and Facebook updates when the show is on, I’m not the only one who has been hooked on the BBC show Frozen Planet.

The beautiful Arctic creatures and their habits are gripping, and the chance to view the earth’s last truly wild landscape is gripping – but the stark message that echoes underneath this beautifully shot documentary series is that these scenes will not last much longer if climate change continues. The seven part series, aims to create a permanent record of the arctic regions before they change forever – and anyone seeing the penguins

By using green energy, and reducing our consumption we can help slow the changes which are destroying this vast and natural habitat for Arctic creatures. Which is well worth thinking about next time the TV is on standby. Here’s a trailer for anyone who hasn’t yet seen the show:

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Renewable energy report

Just spotted this YouTube report about the wind farm off the coast of Thanet in Kent. offshore wind farms loo quite smart, but how fast do the HAWT’s blades go in gale force winds. That’s what I want to know. If any of my esteemed readers has witnessed a storm in a windfarm, please let me know…!

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Isle of Lewis Residents to Pay For Wind Farm

isle of lewis wind farms

Wind farms - coming soon the the Isle of Lewis

It was on this exact day 2 years ago that we posted about the blocking of a Wind Farm application on the Isle of Lewis. At the time there were widespread complaints from some island residents and campaign groups that the wind turbines would have a detrimental affect on the tourism and wildlife of Lewis, particularly the bird population (Scotland’s largest). Well, it now seems that the tide has turned completely and the Isle of Lewis scheme has been given the go-ahead as part of the Scottish Governments latest ‘green energy’ plans. However, it seems that the islanders (whether the want to or not) are going to have to pay £18.5m to buy the equiptment to make it happen.

As with all of these major rural developments there are a wide range of viewpoints – is the generation of power from renewable sources more important than preserving the natural beauty of these landscapes?. A very difficult question to answer, and we imagine even more problematic for the Isle of Lewis residents that will have to live with the development every day.

What are your opinons on this wind farm – should it have been given the go-ahead?

For further information on this developing story see:

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