Posts Tagged climate change

The History of Energy

This is a great infographic I found from the Discovery Channel on the history of energy and it’s use throughout Europe. You can click the image to head to the original source of the infogrpahic

The History of Energy

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Denmark offer renewable energy insight for other nations

Denmark has long been one of Europe’s leading renewable energy adopters and they have managed to maintain a steady pace with regards to increasing the amount of energy they produce from renewable sources.
Now the Danes are offering their renewable energy model for other nations to copy and help generate their own renewable energy supply. At the moment around 28% of Danish energy comes from renewables but they are aiming high and want to see 50% by 2020 and as much as 100% by 2050.

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Frozen planet: a real look at climate change

By the looks of Twitter and Facebook updates when the show is on, I’m not the only one who has been hooked on the BBC show Frozen Planet.

The beautiful Arctic creatures and their habits are gripping, and the chance to view the earth’s last truly wild landscape is gripping – but the stark message that echoes underneath this beautifully shot documentary series is that these scenes will not last much longer if climate change continues. The seven part series, aims to create a permanent record of the arctic regions before they change forever – and anyone seeing the penguins

By using green energy, and reducing our consumption we can help slow the changes which are destroying this vast and natural habitat for Arctic creatures. Which is well worth thinking about next time the TV is on standby. Here’s a trailer for anyone who hasn’t yet seen the show:

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‘Sustainable Energy – without the hot air’, fantastic free book

Sustainable Energy - without the hot air

This is amongst the best books ive read on the energy sector in a long time – ‘Sustainable Energy – without the hot air‘ by David Mackay (a Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Cambridge). I really can’t do the work justice in a short blog post and i don’t really need to as you can download the entire book in PDF format for yourselves. There is a 10 page synopsis available for anyone who doesn’t fancy downloading 27mb. I would recommend that anyone with an interest in sustainable energy get hold of this text somehow – you can also buy a copy from Amazon for £19.99.

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Copenhagen Off To Stormy Start

Copenhagen is only officially three days old and has almost managed to draw as much controversy as Tiger Woods private life. Here’s a quick summary of the main stories so far from Copenhagen……

  • Email scandal – even before the conference kicked off we had the leaking of a controversial group of emails from the University of East Anglia which seemed to suggest that academic research from climate change “deniers” should be supressed. This was immediately seized upon by sceptics to paint the entire climate change movement with the same brush, and rubbish the entirity of scientific evidence for man-made Climate Change. Not the best of starts then……….
  • Developing countries have been “outraged” by draft agreement that would see the bulk of decision making powers of the future switch to the developed nations and remove the power of the UN in situations such as these. Not exactly the unified front that was hoped for before the conference began then. Infact, the developing nations have even began to bicker amongst themselves (something that rarely happens at big summits like these, they normally stick together). However, hope may come in the shape of billionaire investor George Soros, who has a proposal the rich countries hand their $150bn (£92bn) of Special Drawing Rights to poor countries for immediate use to combat climate change – will they agree to this?
  • Sarah Palin has produced an editorial denouncing Copenhagen and all it stands for, urging President Obama to forget about it. Is she right?

Quite a first couple of days! and we haven’t even reached the critical point of the conference yet!

What are your thoughts on the first few days of Copenhagen 2009?

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Copenhagen 2009 – Conference Coverage On The Web

Copenhagen 2009 - 7th - 18th December

The United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen is just under three weeks away (Dec 7th to Dec 18th) and the last few days have seen some high stakes political games going on behind the scenes. UK Foreign Secretary David Miliband has described the negiotiations as:

………..the most complex set of international negotiations ever, on any issue

With a conference dealing with such complex issues it can be difficult to track what exactly is going onopinion on what will actually be achieved at the conference seems to be shifting constantly. There are screeds of  Copenhagen coverage around the web – these are what we will be checking in the run up to and during the conference itself.

Official Pages

News Coverage

Newspapers

The Blogosphere

Hopefully there will be a channel that will provide you with the latest news from Copenhagen to meet your requirements. We are aiming to post on all the major developments as they happen.

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IEA warns of huge cost for energy ‘revolution’

Climate Change Is Needed Now

Climate Change

The IEA has warned everyone to brace themselves for the biggest energy revolution the world has ever seen.  The economic crises gives us and the electricity suppliers the opportunity to make things right in the world by spearheading  a worldwide low carbon energy surge that will fight global warming and ensure we have enough energy supplies around the globe.

A Very little amount of people actually realize the size of the tasks we face in the next few decades to tackle global warming whilst still supplying the energy that we have become so reliant on over the last 100 years.

The International Energy Agency said:“But it can and must be met,” it said. “The time to act has arrived.”

The reality of the damages that climate change “will” cause is starting to became clear, yet while everyone is making a lot of noises about it and setting targets the question has to be asked: Are we doing enough? We all know the answer to that is no, but countries who laughed at the idea 10 years ago (including the United States of America) are starting to come round and year by year we have more and more countries signing up to agreements to reduce our carbon footprint.

Just next month (December 2009) the landmark international Conference will be held in Copenhagen. The IEA is expected to tell the top 30 industrialized countries that they along with the rest of the planet will face dire consequences if they continue with their current policies on energy and climate change.

Change is needed, and now.

Read and rewritten byGavin Boyd with his own views added.

Original Article

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