Posts Tagged clean electricity

Burning Trees to Produce Electric “Worse Than Coal”

In a plan to cut carbon emissions power stations around the UK are being encouraged to burn wood in order to cut carbon omissions.  The UK Government argue that burning “biomass” is a carbon neutral process and will offer subsidies to stations which start using wood to produce power instead of coal.

One of the country’s largest coal fired stations, Drax, is aiming to replace half of its coal energy output and replace with biomass.  Eggborough, in North Yorkshire, plans to replace all its coal with wood burning energy production.

The amount of biomass that has been burned for electricity production has doubled in capacity in the last 12 months to approximately 3 million tons and it is thought that this will increase to near enough ten times that amount by 2017.  This means that most of the wood that will be burned for energy in this country will be imported from abroad; already half of current biomass stocks are imported.

However a report from the RSPB, Friends of the Earth and Greenpeace declares that the amount of carbon that is produced when burning wood is higher than that of coal per unit of electricity.  The reason for this is due to the fact that newly cut wood is wet and bulky which means that carbon has already produced through transportation to the power stations as they source wood from as far away as New Zealand as well as having to dry the wood out.

Also as wood, in weight, is half water so the amount of wood required is far more than you would need to produce the same amount of energy with coal.  Even when the trees are replanted the amount of time it would take to offset the amount of carbon already produced is too great to make a difference.

More information can be found on the RSPB website.

So what do you think about biomass energy production?  Please feel free to leave a comment below.

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Alternative Energy Investments

alternative energyWith the alternative energy industry now reaching an annual turnover over of $9.2 billion pounds it is pretty easy to understand why the modern day investers are filling up their portfolios with energy stock investments. The long term growth of these investments is pretty good looking as we sail in to the 21 century.
It is true to say that if you where to invest in a new start-up green electricity company you could be investing in the Apple Mac or Google of our generation in terms of return in investment, people are getting fed up with rising fuel costs and by investing in these new alternative energy sources you would be acting as a market maker for the people who want to be receiving more green electricity and paying less on their energy bills.

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Green Power on the rise

Post in Response to : https://greenerpower.wordpress.com/2008/01/31/going-green-makes-good-business-sense/

Hi-Yep it is good to see that big business is recognising that by going green it does not necessarily follow that profits will suffer. They are finally beginning to realise that they could capitalise on the rise of ‘Green Consciousness’ amongst the UK population, and if thats the case then it should bode well for the environment.

Indeed, it is encouraging to see Scottish Hydro Electric implementing what they call their ‘better plan‘, which sounds like an excellent scheme to induce households accross the UK into increasing their day to day energy efficiency (100% hydro-electricity offered).

However, there is still a long road ahead as according to Statistics Estonia, although electricity generation from Renewables is increasing steadily (+7.5% from 2005-2006), the overall percentage of UK electricity generated in 2006 was only 4.6% – this is comapred to Germany (10.5%), France (11.3%), Sweden (54.3%), Austria (57.4%) and Norway (108.4%!).

More information on UK energy available here.

So, hopefully now the green energy momentum is staring to build in both the business sector and in the case of individual households we can look forward to closing the gap on the rest of Europe.

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